Sharpening

  • 05 Nov 2011 9:06 AM
    Message # 742826
    Anonymous
    Hey Rob,
    I'm looking at getting some shapton stones in the future and was wondering why you would need a 4000 stone if all you use is a 1000 and 16000? Is there another use for the 4000 stone and if so how would you use it?

    I was also wondering how you prepare/sharpen a brand new iron and chisel? i.e your process of flattening the back etc. Do you even flatten the back of a plane iron or does the ruler trick cover this?

    Many thanks,
    Andy
  • 05 Nov 2011 10:32 AM
    Reply # 742857 on 742826
    ROB COSMAN (Administrator)
    Anonymous wrote:Hey Rob,
    I'm looking at getting some shapton stones in the future and was wondering why you would need a 4000 stone if all you use is a 1000 and 16000? Is there another use for the 4000 stone and if so how would you use it?

    I was also wondering how you prepare/sharpen a brand new iron and chisel? i.e your process of flattening the back etc. Do you even flatten the back of a plane iron or does the ruler trick cover this?

    Many thanks,
    Andy


    Hi Andy, we just shot an episode about flattening chisel backs, should be up the first of the week.  the 4k is for doing the chisel backs between the coarse stone flatening snd the final stone polishing.  the ruler trick will cover plane blade backs if they are the brand that comes flat out of the box.

    rob

     

  • 06 Nov 2011 2:27 AM
    Reply # 743226 on 742826
    Anonymous
    Rob, just to confirm - you don't flatten the back of your plane irons, you just use the ruler trick?
    You only flatten the backs of chisels (using 4K) as you can't use the ruler trick on them?

    Thanks
  • 06 Nov 2011 4:55 PM
    Reply # 743504 on 742826
    Deleted user
    Rob - I'm gettingon in age with COPD.  Consequently, I have difficulty pushing planes through wood.  The finest grit waterstone that I have is 8000.  Will 16000 or 30000 grits be a noticeable improvement?  Thanks
  • 07 Nov 2011 9:06 AM
    Reply # 744116 on 743504
    ROB COSMAN (Administrator)
    Anonymous wrote:Rob - I'm gettingon in age with COPD.  Consequently, I have difficulty pushing planes through wood.  The finest grit waterstone that I have is 8000.  Will 16000 or 30000 grits be a noticeable improvement?  Thanks


    dont think you would notice any major difference.  the arguement for the finer stones has more to do with edge life than planing resistance.  finer scratches, more metal on the cutting edge.  Now if i was going to tackle this problem there are several things i would do that collectively would make a difference; 

    1-get a really flat sole

    2-polish the sole to 400 or even 800 grit

    3-very sharp blade (smaller grit stones) 16k makes the most sense economically

    4-wax frequently

    5-light cut, one thou or less shavings (this would require more frequent sharpenings to keep the blade in that super sharp phase)

    6-work easy to plane woods

    7-save yourself a lot of excercise by not lifting the plane up after each pass.  I pull the shaving out, drag the plane back and continue the process.  if you dont remove the shaving it somtimes gets pulled under the plane and gets stuck to the board of sole of the plane. 

    try these ideas and let me know what you find.  cheers

    rob

     

  • 07 Nov 2011 9:12 AM
    Reply # 744125 on 743226
    ROB COSMAN (Administrator)
    Anonymous wrote:Rob, just to confirm - you don't flatten the back of your plane irons, you just use the ruler trick?
    You only flatten the backs of chisels (using 4K) as you can't use the ruler trick on them?

    Thanks


    the ruler trick is all that is needed on the plane blades provided they are flat from the factory.  older blades may very well need flattening.  here is a case where i would buy a new pre-flattened blade rather than spend an hour or more working on a relic. 

    chisels need flat backs, that is how they operate.  NO RULER TRICK on chisels.  the backs need to be flattened first on a 1k, then have those scratches removed on a 4 or 6k, then remove those scratches on an 8k or which ever finishing stone you use.  all the while being careful to keep the back flat.  cheers

    rob

     

  • 07 Nov 2011 12:05 PM
    Reply # 744284 on 742826

    Rob,

    Would moving to narrower planes be of assistance? For L-N planes,

    A #5-1/2 has a 2-3/8" width blade.

    A #5 has a 2" width blade.

    A #5-1/4 has a 1-3/4" width blade.

     

    Jim

  • 07 Nov 2011 2:58 PM
    Reply # 744430 on 744284
    ROB COSMAN (Administrator)
    Anonymous wrote:

    Rob,

    Would moving to narrower planes be of assistance? For L-N planes,

    A #5-1/2 has a 2-3/8" width blade.

    A #5 has a 2" width blade.

    A #5-1/4 has a 1-3/4" width blade.

     

    Jim


    good point Jim!

    rob

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