Fishtail/Skew and Dovetail Chisels

  • 28 Oct 2011 3:27 AM
    Message # 735768
    Hi,
    What is the difference between these three Chisels and can they all do the same job?
    Also considering the amount of different hand planes there are available do you think we get carried away with what we actually need and what we really need, I read that Alan Peters got by with just a number 7 for most of his work, is that correct? 
    We seem to be snowed under with High Angle, Low Angle,Mid pitch,York pitch,Bronze or Steel,Carbon steel or A2 for the blades, deep frozen or heat treated.....all a little confusing and would probably take a lesson all to itself.
    Regards
    Michael Redmond.
  • 28 Oct 2011 11:41 PM
    Reply # 736642 on 735768
    ROB COSMAN (Administrator)
    Michael Redmond wrote:Hi,
    What is the difference between these three Chisels and can they all do the same job?
    Also considering the amount of different hand planes there are available do you think we get carried away with what we actually need and what we really need, I read that Alan Peters got by with just a number 7 for most of his work, is that correct? 
    We seem to be snowed under with High Angle, Low Angle,Mid pitch,York pitch,Bronze or Steel,Carbon steel or A2 for the blades, deep frozen or heat treated.....all a little confusing and would probably take a lesson all to itself.
    Regards
    Michael Redmond.

    No doubt those making planes love to see us buying and confused!  That said they are merely remaking planes that were once very popular.  Alan did a lot more with power tools than I chose to.  He would use an 1/8 router bit to do the base line on 1/2 dovetails.  He is my take.  I lived years without a chisel plane, didnt know they existed till 10 years ago.  I use to use a chisel on its back, the plane version sure makes it easier.  Block planes make for easy one handed use, would not want to give mine up.   Alan would cut the rabbet used to align the tail board over the pin board using the table saw.  I much prefer the skew block plane for that operation.    There are far better made versions of the early Stanley speciality planes than there were in Alan's day.  Some of the creations of Stanley in teh 60's and 70's were pretty bad.  Another that comes to mind is a shoulder plane, tough to do some of those processes with a hand held chisel. 

    As per the various pitch angles, the sharp blade with a shallow setting will do more for perfecting the surface than the other methods. Not that they dont work, I just think they are overrated compared to a well sharpened blade.  I do belive cryo A-2 is a better more wear resistant blade material. 

    two cents

    rob

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