Interlocked grain

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  • 13 Jan 2019 9:24 AM
    Message # 6997945

    I have been trying a number of methodologies to try to deal with tear-out on interlocked grain. I'm using Khaya ivorenisis (African Mahogany)--a beautiful and stout wood--for guitar necks (and winding sticks) but get tear-out, or "fuzzing" of the grain in alternating bands. I've tried getting the plane throat closed down, exposing only a 64th of the blade, sharpening and resharpening but I still get this "fuzz" along these bands or "ribbons". I know it will sand out but I'm wondering if I'm missing something with the plane. Do I need to change the secondary bevel angle? Any thoughts?

    Last modified: 13 Jan 2019 9:25 AM | Anonymous member
  • 13 Jan 2019 11:06 AM
    Reply # 6998012 on 6997945
    Anonymous wrote:

    I have been trying a number of methodologies to try to deal with tear-out on interlocked grain. I'm using Khaya ivorenisis (African Mahogany)--a beautiful and stout wood--for guitar necks (and winding sticks) but get tear-out, or "fuzzing" of the grain in alternating bands. I've tried getting the plane throat closed down, exposing only a 64th of the blade, sharpening and resharpening but I still get this "fuzz" along these bands or "ribbons". I know it will sand out but I'm wondering if I'm missing something with the plane. Do I need to change the secondary bevel angle? Any thoughts?


    You need a high angle blade (in the neighborhood of 65 degrees) and a name so we can address our answers.

    Carry on.

    Larry

  • 13 Jan 2019 1:39 PM
    Reply # 6998267 on 6997945

    Hi Larry, and thanks. I was wondering if that bevel needed to be much more extreme.

    On the other note, not even sure how to add a picture yet...new to this forum. For now, I'll just sign below.

    Thanks again,

    Brian

  • 13 Jan 2019 3:53 PM
    Reply # 6998453 on 6997945

    Brian, your original post concerned the secondary bevel.  I'm a little confused, increasing the secondary bevel angle only achieves the objective of a high angle blade if your using a bevel up plane.  Hope that is what you meant.  With a bevel down plane the maximum bevel angle is about 33 degrees.  Theoretically the clearance angle required is 12 degrees because of the spring back after the blade passes over the cut site.  So hence the 33 degrees on a bevel down with a 45 degree frog and the 12 degree seating angle on a bevel up plane.  The "High Angle" referred to is at the front attack edge of the blade, the angle at which the blade first encounters the wood.

    Hope that helps.  Carry on.

    Larry

  • 14 Jan 2019 8:55 AM
    Reply # 6999403 on 6997945

    Brian, another idea for you when you get it planed down where you want it go over the wood with a cabinet scraper. A card scraper or a number 70 scraper plane ( I think that's the number)   The cabinet scraper can work in any direction without tearing the grain and should remove all the fuzzyness. 

    Branko

  • 15 Jan 2019 9:12 AM
    Reply # 7001837 on 6999403
    Anonymous wrote:

    Brian, another idea for you when you get it planed down where you want it go over the wood with a cabinet scraper. A card scraper or a number 70 scraper plane ( I think that's the number)   The cabinet scraper can work in any direction without tearing the grain and should remove all the fuzzyness. 

    Branko

    I've got a card scraper or two laying around here and don't know why they didn't come to mind. Maybe its because I'm just not experienced with them yet. Great idea. I'll try it out today!
  • 18 Jan 2019 10:46 AM
    Reply # 7008429 on 6997945
    Anonymous

    They can be tricky to sharpen but should solve your problem.  Does Rob have a video showing howto sharpen a card scraper?

    Brett

  • 18 Jan 2019 5:52 PM
    Reply # 7009244 on 6997945

    Put a 20 degree back bevel on the back of your blade. standard angle frog and standard sharpening angles. Rob shows this a few times. This is how I address it, and swear by it.

  • 19 Jan 2019 9:27 AM
    Reply # 7009875 on 7008429
    Anonymous wrote:

    They can be tricky to sharpen but should solve your problem.  Does Rob have a video showing howto sharpen a card scraper?

    Brett


    I'm pretty new to them--have two Bahco scrapers (a thin and a thick one) and have been dipping my toe in the water slowly. Managed to get a fair edge on one of them and used that to scrape my African mahogany with pretty good results. I'm going to have to rededicate myself to the job of learning these valuable little tools.
  • 19 Jan 2019 9:30 AM
    Reply # 7009876 on 7009244
    Richard Blair wrote:

    Put a 20 degree back bevel on the back of your blade. standard angle frog and standard sharpening angles. Rob shows this a few times. This is how I address it, and swear by it.


    I was about the back-bevel thing...I have an extra blade now for my jointer AND my smoother (bought Hock replacements for both). Kind of like Rob did, I may dedicate the older blades to high-angle duty. Good suggestion.
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