Dementioning lumber by hand

  • 24 Jun 2017 2:31 AM
    Message # 4915196
    Anonymous
    So before I get into creating too many bad habits can someone please remind me if there is a certian order of the sides you are supposed to work in when dementioning lumber by hand? Face side side face end end?
  • 24 Jun 2017 9:28 AM
    Reply # 4915548 on 4915196
    Anonymous wrote:So before I get into creating too many bad habits can someone please remind me if there is a certian order of the sides you are supposed to work in when dementioning lumber by hand? Face side side face end end?

    Good Morning,

    This is the method I like to use:

    1. Crosscut and rip the workpiece to rough size.  This lessens the work load later and also can lessen the amount of wood you need to remove by limiting the warp, cup, wind, etc. (also allows you to choose pleasing figure)

    2. Create a perfect flat Reference Face from which all future measurements can be taken.  Plane this face flat in all respects.

    3. Create one Reference Edge straight and square to the Reference Face.  Mark these two surfaces as references and hence forth take all measurements from them.

    4. Use a marking gauge to scribe the workpiece finished thickness from the Reference Face and plane the second face to the scribe lines.

    5. Scribe your finished width (panel gauge or marking gauge) and plane square to reference Face and to scribe line.

    6. Shoot one end square to Reference Edge and Face.

    7. Crosscut and shoot other end to finished length and square to the Reference Edge and Face.

    I found that a lot of my students paid little attention to what they were measuring FROM and this was a source of error problems later in their projects.  If what you are measuring from is unreliable then so too is the result of that measurement.  Starting with a true Reference Face and referring to that Face always can add a great deal or precision to your work. Hope this helps.

    Carry on.

    Larry



    Last modified: 26 Jun 2017 9:30 AM | Anonymous member
  • 25 Jun 2017 9:44 PM
    Reply # 4917246 on 4915196
    Anonymous
    Larry,  Good set of steps.


    I would add one additional step before #4.  The scribe line for the thickness is much more accurate and easier to read if all 4 edges have been planed.  Even though not to final dimension, it is useful to shoot all 3 of the remaining edges.

    So I would add:


    3.5 Shoot all remaining edges (3) so that they are perpendicular to the reference face and have a smooth planed surface.


    Rich Scott



  • 26 Jun 2017 9:35 AM
    Reply # 4917543 on 4915196

    Hi Rich,

    Yup, either way works as long as you've got good precision on steps 2 and 3.  From then on you can alter the order and sometimes it's beneficial to do so, depending on circumstances.

    Carry on.

    Larry


    Note: I use the larger diameter wheels on my marking gauges and they tend to leave a good line even on rough cut edges.

    Last modified: 26 Jun 2017 9:36 AM | Anonymous member
  • 28 Jun 2017 1:14 PM
    Reply # 4922241 on 4915196
    Anonymous

    Rick & Larry,

    Thanks for the info and experience. I was able to take one of the classes Rob gave in April. For the life of me I couldn't remember the order or if it mattered when we dimensioned the lumber. (was too busy trying to square it up and absorb the plethora of info that was coming out of Robs mouth lol). 

    Devon Wright (USMC)

  • 29 Jun 2017 12:14 AM
    Reply # 4923166 on 4915196

    2.5- use your winding sticks on the reference face before working any other edge or face. This will get any twists or "wind" out of that face. If you don't, then you will end up with a perfectly smooth twisted board

  • 29 Jun 2017 11:12 AM
    Reply # 4924049 on 4923166
    Richard Blair wrote:

    2.5- use your winding sticks on the reference face before working any other edge or face. This will get any twists or "wind" out of that face. If you don't, then you will end up with a perfectly smooth twisted board


    Hi Richard,

    Please don't confuse things.  Wind is indeed important and was one of the respects I was referring to in "all respects".  Also "smooth" is a function of the finishing phase of a project and addressed at that time .  The object of step #2 is purely "flat in all respects"

    Carry on.

    Larry


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